8 Methods For Enhancing Your Gut Microbiome

by: Chloe Bennet, Health Journalist

The human body is full of bacteria that range many species. A considerable proportion of the bacteria in your body is actually in your gut, and they are some of the most important for your health. Despite media reports, only a small percentage of stomach bacteria is truly associated with illness. The rest of your intestinal flora is vital for your health.

How probiotic stomach bacteria thrive in your gut biome is heavily influenced by what you eat. To stay healthy, you want to eat probiotic foods that will foster beneficial stomach bacteria in your gut biome. Let’s take a look at what helps.

Consume Fiber-Rich Prebiotics

Fiber is a vital but under-discussed part of the human diet. These sugars are hard for our body to break down but serve as food for probiotics in the gut biome. Therefore, prebiotics for probiotics will help with restoring gut flora for beneficial stomach bacteria.

In addition to helping the stomach bacteria grow, fiber also assists in flushing out the gut biome. Unfortunately, the Standard American Diet (SAD) is rich in saturated fats that are clogging up the system.

Ultimate Guide to Weight Gut Axis
Learn More: Ultimate Guide to Gut-Weight Axis

Fiber would be beneficial in clearing up some GI problems caused by poor dietary choices. Unfortunately, not enough people are consuming these sugars.

One analysis found,

“Although adequate intake of all types of fiber is associated with many health benefits, an estimated 95% of American adults and children do not consume recommended amounts of fiber [1].”

Am J Lifestyle Med

You should be eating about twice the amount of fiber that you currently are. There is a range of associated long-term benefits as well, like reduction in heart disease and some cancers.

Fermented Foods for Intestinal Flora

If you need probiotics, then eat probiotic foods. Fermented food is really useful for maintaining your gut microbiome. The reason for this is that fermented food contains bacteria. These probiotic bacteria are formed in brine as yeast in an airtight environment feast on the sugars of fermented fruits and vegetables.

Eating fermented foods ensures your gut biome maintains healthy levels of beneficial stomach bacteria in your gut.

The fermentation process

While rare in the SAD, try consuming fermented food like:

As a member of the Thryve Gut Health Program, their accredited nutritionists help you implement the right probiotic foods into a healthy gut diet plan tailored for you. Based on the stomach bacteria in your system, they can help you figure out which probiotic foods are best for restoring gut flora that are beneficial to your unique gut biome!

Eat Diverse Foods Within a Healthy Gut Diet Plan

Variety is the spice of the life, especially when it comes to creating diversity within microbes. To foster this growth, you need to create diversity on the plate as well.

“The greater the range of bacteria, the greater the range of health benefits. So, to help foster this sense of internal diversity, you are going to want to make your diet diverse. If you catch yourself in too consistent a routine of the same shopping trolley every week you might want to start thinking about learning a few new culinary tricks.”

Jenna Laughton, health expert at PaperFellows and EssayRoo

One of the best ways to achieve this success is by making the most of your nutrient absorption. To follow a healthy gut diet plan, make sure you’re getting a range of colors on your plate and combine nutrient-dense foods that compliment one another’s bioavailability.

Drink Some Alcohol

For most people, they don’t need to be told by this article to have a drink from time to time. But it may be one of the few areas in which it is recommended that you do indulge in a little alcohol.

Drink up…just responsibly

Alcohol is a product of fermentation. Ask anyone who has tried fermenting fruits and ended up a bit tipsy. Yeast breaks down sugars into alcohol. If you are consuming the right beverages like a good wine or less-processed beer, then you may introduce beneficial microbes to your stomach bacteria.

Now, don’t go crazy. Alcohol is also known to wipe out your stomach bacteria as well. Long-term excessive alcohol intake is linked to many gastrointestinal disorders.

Research finds,

“Clinical and preclinical data suggest that alcohol-related disorders are associated with quantitative and qualitative dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota and may be associated with increased GIT inflammation, intestinal hyperpermeability resulting in endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and tissue damage/organ pathologies including ALD [2].”

Alcohol Res

Not to sound like a highway patrol PSA, but always drink in moderation. If you are drinking as part of a healthy gut diet plan, a glass of wine a night would suffice.

Try Microbiome Testing

If you are living a life of GI problems, then you’re living no life at all. Instead of downing Pepto Bismol or making far too many trips to the bathroom, try getting to the bottom of your GI issues. Try a gut health test kit.

Thryve Gut Health Test Kit and Probotics Foods
Learn More with the
Thryve Gut Health Program

There are many microbiome testing companies popping up. However, Thryve was one of the first…and they keep transforming the game. With Thryve, they send you everything you need to conduct microbiome testing in the privacy of your own bathroom.

Mail in a sample with the tools and discreet packaging they provide you with the Thryve At-Home Microbiome Testing Kit. Their specialists will analyze your DNA sample. Based on the results of your gut test, they will formulate personalized probiotics supplements that get delivered to your door each month.

Take Prebiotics Supplements

Probiotic bacteria are living cultures. They need to feast on food to survive. Therefore, they need to eat the foods you consume through your healthy gut diet plan. These dietary choices include the supplements you take. Not eating enough fiber like the other 95%? Take prebiotics supplements.

stomach bacteria supplements
A little help never hurts

A prebiotic supplement is essentially like a fertilizer for the pastures in your intestine. It promotes stomach bacteria growth and sustenance.

Prebiotic supplements act as an enhancer for the bacteria you also consume through your dietary choices. They pick up the slack your diet leaves.

Using prebiotic supplements are not absolutely essential to take it in supplement form. Prebiotics comes inherent in certain types of fruits, vegetables, and grains as well.

Follow the Hygiene Hypothesis

There are proven studies that show a link between lack of intestinal flora activity and being too clean. This phenomenon is known as the hygiene hypothesis. The theory states that your immune system isn’t as robust as it should be because your gut biome hasn’t been introduced to a wide enough portfolio of microbes. While we are down in infections as a society, we have seen a rise in autoimmune issues.

One analysis looking at this theory found,

“Changes of lifestyle in industrialized countries have led to a decrease of the infectious burden and are associated with the rise of allergic and autoimmune diseases, according to the ‘hygiene hypothesis [3]’.”

Clin Exp Immunol

The analysis looked at developed countries (where exposure to germs is less common). They found that compared to underdeveloped areas, there has been an increase in autoimmune conditions such as:

  • 15% Increase in Asthma [4]
  • 15%-30% Increase in Children, 2%-10% Increase in Adults with Atopical Dermatitis [5]
  • Rise in Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and IBS [6]

Usually, people who are obsessive about hygiene have a psychological issue surrounding it, such as OCD. Seeing as there is such a strong link in the gut brain connection, if you cannot control your impulses to remain clean, please seek help from a professional.

Get Your Polyphenols On

Polyphenols are compounds that are found in a range of foods. They have a spectrum of health benefits relating to blood pressure, cholesterol and more [7]. What makes polyphenols so great for a healthy gut diet plan is they are rich in antioxidants.

According to Ellen Mackenzie, nutrition writer and developer of StateOfWriting and Custom Essays,

“Another unusual element to polyphenols is that they are quite difficult for human digestive cells to handle. The result of this is that they travel beyond the early digestive stage and wind their way towards the colon where gut bacteria do the digestion of food.”

Ellen Mackenzie, nutrition writer and developer of StateOfWriting and Custom Essays

You can find polyphenols in foods like dark chocolate, green tea, almonds, and grape skins. If you are looking for more direction on how to add polyphenols to your healthy gut diet plan, consider enrolling in the Thryve Gut Health Program.

Thryve Probiotics Gut Health

Chloe Bennet is a health journalist at Custom Essay Writing and UK Coursework Writing websites. She writes about fitness, wellness, and yoga. Also, Chloe teaches academic writing at Australian Help service.

Resources

[1] Quagliani, D., & Felt-Gunderson, P. (2016). Closing America’s Fiber Intake Gap: Communication Strategies From a Food and Fiber Summit. American journal of lifestyle medicine11(1), 80–85. doi:10.1177/1559827615588079

[2] Engen, Phillip A, et al. “The Gastrointestinal Microbiome: Alcohol Effects on the Composition of Intestinal Microbiota.” Alcohol Research : Current Reviews, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26695747.

[3] Okada, H., Kuhn, C., Feillet, H., & Bach, J. F. (2010). The ‘hygiene hypothesis’ for autoimmune and allergic diseases: an update. Clinical and experimental immunology160(1), 1–9. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2010.04139.x

[4] Eder, Waltraud, et al. “The Asthma Epidemic.” The New England Journal of Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 23 Nov. 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17124020.

[5] Bieber, Thomas. “Atopic Dermatitis.” The New England Journal of Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 3 Apr. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18385500.

[6] Bach, Jean-Francois. “The Effect of Infections on Susceptibility to Autoimmune and Allergic Diseases.” The New England Journal of Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 19 Sept. 2002, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12239261/.

[7] Pandey, K. B., & Rizvi, S. I. (2009). Plant polyphenols as dietary antioxidants in human health and disease. Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity2(5), 270–278. doi:10.4161/oxim.2.5.9498